Kata Bunkai Drill

So you’ve seen 5 year old kids pull off remarkably sharp kata like this:

And you’ve seen competitors jump high like this (2:20):

And you’ve probably got a handful of students who are *really* sharp too…

But as aesthetically pleasing as these examples are, it surprises me how many students can’t actually apply the movements of the kata in a realistic and effective manner against another person. Fresh air techniques can look sharp and powerful, but lack of understanding and being able to actually make the techniques work are two completely different things.

Random thought…

Remember that movie “Days of Thunder” with Tom Cruise? He was ultra fast on an open track – faster than everyone else. But he had to learn to deal with other drivers pushing and nudging him, and that wasn’t so easy.

It’s the same deal here. Students might look great, but can they apply?

Here is a little bunkai exercise to help students bridge the gap between technique and application.

It works like this…

  1. Pick a random sequence of kata. To keep it simple, let’s say the first few moves of say Pinan Shodan / Heian Nidan.
  2. Have one person stand in yoi dachi (ready stance) and have their training partner approach from the left with a punch or shoulder grab.
  3. Now the first person must turn to their left, shift away and apply their bunkai. Once complete return to yoi dachi.
  4. Now the attacker approaches from the right side. The defender applies the same sequence again, but this time using the opposite side of the body.
  5. Now the attacker approaches from directly in front. The defender shifts back (or moves left or right relative to the incoming attack) and makes the application with either side of the body.
  6. Now the attacker approaches from behind and the defender must turn, shift back, left or right and apply the bunkai once more.

Advanced methods:

  1. Attacker approaches from any angle. Defender must apply using whichever side of the body that makes sense. As a general rule move to the opposite side of the incoming attack.
  2. Defender starts with their eyes closed. Attacker approaches from any angle and as soon as they begin their attack, the Defender opens their eyes and applies. The attacker can kiai to alert the Defender before the attack to give them some time to respond. (As opposed to stepping over and punching the defender in the face while their eyes are closed, and THEN then making kiai).
  3. Defender may apply any kata bunkai you specify (example – they can do any application from a chosen Pinan kata), attacker may attack from any direction.
  4. Defender my apply any bunkai they know from any kata, attacker may attack from any direction.

This is all just a precursor (as are ippon kumite, and regular kumite) to more realistic personal defense. An attacker might throw any technique from any direction at any time. The purpose of training is to be prepared for that. This exercise helps students get one step closer.

 

 

4 thoughts on “Kata Bunkai Drill”

  1. Thanks Jerry…. it’s a good one. It takes a little practice for students to get the hang of it, but once they understand it’s a valuable tool in helping apply bunkai. Let me know how it works out for you…

    Reply
  2. Great idea and something I’ve done a lot in the past.
    It’s really interesting to see if you can get all the way through a Kata and have a realistic application for all the techniques.
    If you find you’re performing a move or technique you can’t realistically apply to real life, chances are you’re doing it wrong – discuss t with a senior instructor at the next seminar you do to.

    I had this with Pinan Yondan – the double Soto-Uke in the middle. After speaking with a visiting instructor from Japan it all got cleared up.

    Thanks for an excellent article Jason.

    Reply

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